Christmas Recap, Part I

Well, I must say that I had a great time over the past few days.  I hope that you did too.

On the morning of December 24, we travelled to Naramata, a 5.5 hour drive.  There, we enjoyed a great dinner with my aunt, her family and company.  We stayed up late to open gifts at midnight.  I passed around a box containing Shell Boxes and Dogwood Screwdrivers and asked everyone to choose one item.

Shell Box

The majority of the females selected a Shell Box while the males preferred the Dogwood Screwdrivers.  The one exception was the 12-year old boy who excitedly picked a Shell Box.

The last time my cousin, Michelle, visited us on the Coast, she had made this cherry cribbage board in my workshop with only a little of my guidance.  She wrapped it up and presented it to her boyfriend.  (I must say that she did an outstanding job!)

Cribbage Board by Michelle

We stayed the night and had breakfast while opening stockings Christmas morning.  I found this wooden cube puzzle in mine.  The pieces were very simple to make and the puzzle was fun.  I enjoyed this puzzle and it took me less than ten minutes to put it together.

Wooden Cube Puzzle

I couldn’t help but notice the lack of fine consistency in the pieces.  Some were nicely-sanded on all sides, others were very rough, and at least one had a severe crook in it.  None of these characteristics had any affect on how the puzzle went together, but it was interesting to look at different levels of refinement and think about what was really required.  (see A Box Called “Tolerences” and A Box Called “Necessessity?”)

Wooden Cube Puzzle, Disassembled

The rest of this story can be found in Christmas Recap, Part II.

Heirloom Quality Screwdrivers For Sale

My turned screwdrivers are now for sale.  They feature a solid dogwood handle and a polished magnetic bit holder which accepts all 1/4″ hex-shank screwdriver bits.  The price is $25.

To make a screwdriver, I first cut a dogwood blank to size.  Then I bore a 1/4″ hole to accept the shank of the magnetic bit holder and use a forstner bit to square the face of the blank to the hole.

1-Milling Blank

Next, I put some cyanoacrylate glue into the hole and press the bit holder in until it is seated fully.

2-Pressing Parts Together

The screwdriver is mounted in the lathe, with the bit holder in a chuck and a live center supporting the butt end of the handle.

3-Ready to Turn

Finally, the screwdriver is turned to shape and a finish is applied (Photo 4).

4-Finished