More Quotes from Woodwork Magazine

I am continuing to work my way forwards through back issues of the since discontinued magazine Woodwork.

There is some truly fascinating content in these old issues, and one article that comes to mind is Georges Vaufrey’s Wizardly Woodshop. The article describes the processes used by the French company that specializes in producing high quality, precision woodturnings in large volumes (600,000 watch cases in two years, 50,000 pairs of ebony chopsticks a year, for example) with a +/-0.03 to +/-0.05 mm tolerance in hard woods.

The quality of work is partially the result of refined processes and jigs, but human skill is still a key asset.

The Vaufrey sanding system is essentially simple. But in practiced hands, it yields results that defy comparison.

Vaufrey’s sanding methods works beautifully because it puts the operator not the machine, in control of the process.

David and Abram Loft in Georges Vaufrey’s Wizardly Woodshop, issue #35, page 58, paragraphs 1-2

Here are some other interesting quotes I found. Read more on my page, Quotes from Woodwork.

Krenov had asked his students for complete emotional and personal involvement in every aspect of their work, in every detail.

Tom Mcfadden in Ejler Hjorth-Westh ,issue 33, page 37, paragraph 3

Furniture is nothing but practical sculpture.

Michael Cullen in Where Engineering, Art, and Woodworking; Meet: Michael Cullen by Tom Mcfadden, issue 35, page 34, paragraph 3

The reason so much old furniture has survived can be attributed to the fact that hide glue was the only glue available until recently. Furniture repair had to be done with it. Considerable damage has been done to old furniture since the introduction of modern glues, because repairmen can (and usually do) chose to use another glue.

Bob Flexner in Animal Hide Glue, issue 35, page 46, paragraph 8

5 thoughts on “More Quotes from Woodwork Magazine

  1. In the early 1990’s I ran across Woodwork at my local bookstore and was instantly hooked. I had already been reading Fine Woodworking for several years and was catching on to the fact that they go through a cycle of the same stories; those days it took about 5 years. Finding Woodwork was like discovering a “next level” of cool stuff you didn’t even suspect existed! I subscribed for most of the rest of their run, and even had my first woodworking publication there! (A tip on how to gauge the pressure you use to make a burr on a scraper.) I still miss that magazine, nothing has really taken its place for me.

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