Big Wood Slab Sale/Moving Sale

When:

  • September 29-30, 10 am – 4 pm
  • Sunday October 1 by appointment only

Where: 1114 Barberry Place, Port Moody, BC… wood shed around the right side

Wood Slabs for Sale!

I gave up some shop space when I moved, but the real loss was wood storage space. With only limited wood storage, I brought with me the material I needed. The rest – about 1500 board feet – stayed behind. Now it’s time for it to move, too.

I don’t have space to store it, and I’m not going to pay for storage fees, so I’m selling it.

Benefits of Buying from Me Instead of from a Commercial Lumberyard

Of course, you’re supporting me and helping me clear out surplus material, but there are many benefits for you as well.

Fully Air-Dried and Ready to Use

All of the wood has been air-dried for at least five years and is stored in a dry environment, so it is ready to be used. If you’re not familiar with working air-dried wood, I think you’ll find it to be a treat. The drying process has not been rushed, so there is less tension in the wood. This means less risk of warping in the future. Air-dried wood also feels less brittle. It cuts smoother, and this is particularly evident if using hand tools.

Two Live Edges Intact for Unlimited Possibilities!

Since much of my work revolves around the natural characteristics of wood, I have been careful to preserve the live edges. Whether you are making a dining or coffee table, mantel, headboard, or chopsticks, you will have the option to leave the bark intact, remove the outer bark only, or cut off the entire live edge for uniform lumber. The slabs have been moved and stored either on end or flat, but never on edge.

I Saw the Whole Tree, Through and Through!

My inventory consists of sets of slabs that together comprise an entire tree. This is useful because it makes matching grain and colour easy. This means that you can bookmatch two sequential boards for perfect continuity without resawing and losing thickness, or ensure all the drawer fronts look consistent. This also means that you’ll find beautiful flatsawn grain patterns, riftsawn wood for straight-grained legs, and quartersawn wood for a straight-grained look and stability.

Plus, you’ll find some nice wide slabs, perfect for table tops.

Domestic Hardwoods, Sustainably Harvested

This wood is from BC trees. Many of the species are not commercially available or easy to find. I helped mill much of it, and have worked with all of them and can share my experiences.

Please come by to have a look. Cash preferred, but I can also accept credit cards. Sorry – no debit. Delivery can be arranged if required.

Want to know what goes into milling logs? Click here to read about one day of milling.

More Quotes from Woodwork Magazine

I am continuing to work my way forwards through back issues of the since discontinued magazine Woodwork.

There is some truly fascinating content in these old issues, and one article that comes to mind is Georges Vaufrey’s Wizardly Woodshop. The article describes the processes used by the French company that specializes in producing high quality, precision woodturnings in large volumes (600,000 watch cases in two years, 50,000 pairs of ebony chopsticks a year, for example) with a +/-0.03 to +/-0.05 mm tolerance in hard woods.

The quality of work is partially the result of refined processes and jigs, but human skill is still a key asset.

The Vaufrey sanding system is essentially simple. But in practiced hands, it yields results that defy comparison.

Vaufrey’s sanding methods works beautifully because it puts the operator not the machine, in control of the process.

David and Abram Loft in Georges Vaufrey’s Wizardly Woodshop, issue #35, page 58, paragraphs 1-2

Here are some other interesting quotes I found. Read more on my page, Quotes from Woodwork.

Krenov had asked his students for complete emotional and personal involvement in every aspect of their work, in every detail.

Tom Mcfadden in Ejler Hjorth-Westh ,issue 33, page 37, paragraph 3

Furniture is nothing but practical sculpture.

Michael Cullen in Where Engineering, Art, and Woodworking; Meet: Michael Cullen by Tom Mcfadden, issue 35, page 34, paragraph 3

The reason so much old furniture has survived can be attributed to the fact that hide glue was the only glue available until recently. Furniture repair had to be done with it. Considerable damage has been done to old furniture since the introduction of modern glues, because repairmen can (and usually do) chose to use another glue.

Bob Flexner in Animal Hide Glue, issue 35, page 46, paragraph 8

New Prize Category: Most Accurate Voter

With a last-minute prize donation from Green Buddy Distributors (distributors of Grex Tools in Canada), there is now one more prize than there are categories. So I’m going to create one new category and shuffle the prizes.

The exciting part is that EVERYBODY is eligible to win!

grex-aos368The winner of this category will be whoever most accurately picks the top Flair Woodwork’s Reader’s Choice Wall Shelves. In the event of a tie, I will contact the voters and we will break the tie.

Have you voted yet? You have until the end of this weekend to cast your vote! Are we having fun yet?

Vote for Your Favourite Wall Shelves!

The Wall Shelf Build-Off submissions are in, and I’ve uploaded them here on my site for your viewing pleasure.

Help choose the Flair Woodworks Reader’s Choice Top 3 Wall Shelves!

View all the entires, then vote for your favourite three by the end of February 12. Then I’ll tally up all the votes and announce winners!

Wall Shelf Build-Off Entries & Voting

How to Follow the Wall Shelf Build-Off

With the big day looming and registration now closed, I’d like to share some links so that you can follow along with the Wall Shelf Build-Off participants. You can also search for the official hashtag #WSBO.

Note that not everybody who registered provided links to where they are sharing their builds. Also, not everybody has committed 100% to participating.

Wall Shelf Build-Off Prize Categories

The Wall Shelf Build-Off starts tomorrow, so now seems like a good time to announce the categories. They are as follows:

  • Best use of materials
  • Best concept
  • Most off-the-wall (figuratively speaking) design
  • Most ambitious design
  • Most innovative design
  • Most inspiring design
  • Judge’s Best Overall
  • Judge’s Second Best Overall
  • Judge’s Third Best Overall
  • Flair Woodworks Reader’s Choice #1
  • Flair Woodworks Reader’s Choice #2
  • Flair Woodworks Reader’s Choice #3

Today is the last day to register to participate in the #WSBO!

Buzz about the Wall Shelf Build-Off

The Wall Shelf-Build-Off starts this weekend and you won’t want to miss it. In face, Jonas Jensen called it “the biggest event since the American presidential inauguration”.

Here’s some of the attention the contest has been getting around the web.

Jim Dillon @ The Thousand Dollar Shop

Garth @ Time Warp Tool Works

Megan Fitzpatrick @ Popular Woodworking

360 Woodworking

The Dusty Life

Jonas Jensen @ Mulesaw

There’s still time to sign up for the #WSBO!

Prizes for the Wall Shelf Build-Off

The Wall Shelf Build-Off is next weekend. Can you believe it?

A Pep Talk

If you’ve been hesitating to register because you don’t have a design, I’d encourage you to register today. Nothing like a little pressure for inspiration – even if it means heading out to the shop next weekend without a clear idea of what you’re doing.

Even though I’ve been doing lots of thinking and sketching, I still haven’t settled on a design. Remember that the event is about getting out in the shop and just making something – not about making a masterpiece.

Sign up for the Wall Shelf Build-Off!

Sponsors and Prizes

I would like to extend a big “thank you” to everybody who volunteered a prize for the #WSBO. I am especially grateful to have so many prizes available to woodworkers outside of North America!

Please use the links below to learn more about the sponsors and their products.

If you would like to contribute a prize, please contact me directly.

Now, where did I leave my collection of sketches…?

What is there to be Afraid of About Failure?

Well, for starters, I’m not sure what failure really is. I’m always experimenting and learning and, to me, what others may perceive as failure is really just an indication that something can be improved. I am always looking for ways to improve things, and constantly analyzing things for weaknesses.

Developing a solid design on paper (or in CAD) is exceedingly difficult, and perhaps impossible. For that reason, many designers, after they have put together a workable idea, create a 3D prototype that they can interact with, test it, and understand ways to make it better.

In almost all cases, there will be a desire to change something. Maybe it doesn’t look or feel right, or maybe it doesn’t operate as it should. These are not failures, but merely a part of the process.

This same mentality can be applied to the work that we woodworkers do. If I make a three legged stool, I might realize, when I test it, that the legs are too close together so it is easier to tip over than I might like. This isn’t a failure – it’s just a step in the design process. Next time I make something similar, whether it be the next day or next decade, I will take into consideration what I learned from the previous versions of the design and make adjustments.

I guess what I am saying is that creating good products requires patience. Developing a good design requires caring and often requires numerous versions, each a little more refined than the last. Quality workmanship takes an investment in time. And it takes time to fully understand a design – the best way I know is to use it in everyday life just as you normally would.

Welcome to the New Shop

Since moving three months ago, I have settled nicely into the new shop that is a one-car garage.

Here are some panoramic pictures to give you a feel for the space. Click to view full-size.

Shop Panorama E

Looking East

Looking South

Looking South

Looking West

Looking West

Looking North

Looking North

All the machines are more or less permanently positioned, and the overhead door is not used (it was last opened to move in the machinery).

Most of my work is done in the triangle between my sliding table saw, drill press, and workbench. That area is the most well-lit, with light provided by two fluorescent light fixtures which, combined, have five of eight bulbs installed. If I need an assembly table, I set up a pair of saw horses and a table top as seen here.

North End of Shop

The dust collector usually lives in the corner behind the table saw, and a flexible hose is run between the table saw, bandsaw, jointer and planer as required. A switch to the left of the bandsaw turns on the dust collector.

South End of Shop

My routers, along with their bits and accessories, are stored in a rolling cabinet next to my drill press, and frequently used drill bits reside on top.

Router Cabinet

Most other tools are stored in the drawers under my split top workbench (the other bench slab is standing up on end in the north-east corner).

East Bench Area

Rarely used equipment, such as my bench grinder, is kept on a rolling cart under the table saw. This area can accommodate 8′ long material, and may become a wood storage location in the future.

Table Saw Area

Currently, I have the area behind the doors at the north end of the shop dedicated for wood storage, as well as the adjacent north-east corner, which accommodates long narrow material. The three doors open into a single space.

Wood Storage Area

And, yes, I reclaimed my shop stool.