Making Mistakes

A friend recommended that I read Hogbin on Woodturning by Stephen Hogbin. I'm just getting into it, and found this comment on making mistakes (page 17): Mistakes happen almost every day and what counts is the ability to work with the situation... If you are not making mistakes your skills are not being tested or extended. Does … Continue reading Making Mistakes

Building More Cribbage Boards and Now Selling on Etsy

One of my goals for this year is to increase sales of my live-edge cribbage boards. I really believe in the product and sales have reinforced that belief. The biggest limiting factor has been supply, as I never had a decent supply of quality material suitable for crib boards, and an immense amount of time … Continue reading Building More Cribbage Boards and Now Selling on Etsy

The Incineration Plane

Using a hand plane to shave down a piece of timber is a delightful experience for all, regardless of age, woodworking ability or interest. There is something so satisfying about it. The slow pace of running a plane over a board can even be therapeutic. Cleaning up shavings, however, is not exactly fun. The curly … Continue reading The Incineration Plane

Can Good Tools Make You a Better Woodworker?

I am sure that most woodworkers appreciate good tools, and while fine tools may enable one to do better quality work than crude tools, a high quality tool will in no way compensate for a lack of skill or care. However, a good tool can certainly inspire the user to do their best work, and I … Continue reading Can Good Tools Make You a Better Woodworker?

Building Without a Plan

I am continuing to work through back issues of the magazine Woodwork and found this quote which I like: What I enjoy about my work is that because there's no sketch, you feel much freer about experimenting with where something might go, or how the thing might look. Michael Cooper in Hardly Davidson by David Colman, issue #49, page … Continue reading Building Without a Plan

A Single Defining Element

I found another good quote from the back issues of Woodwork. This one is from the article titled Judy Ditmer: The Power of Acceptance by Kerry Pierce in issue #45, from June 1997. It resonates with me, as this way of working is not unfamiliar to me. “‘Stephen Jay Gould, the archaeologist and teacher... discussed a … Continue reading A Single Defining Element

Good Tools Work for You, Not Against You

Nearly every tool is designed with compromises. In some cases, the compromise is made to increase the ease of production (and therefore lower cost). Other times, the compromise is made to make the tool more appealing to a broader audience. After using a tool for a while, these compromises become very clear. You'll think, "I … Continue reading Good Tools Work for You, Not Against You

Power Tools vs. Hand Tools, and When Can You Modify the Design?

I am continuing to work my way forwards through back issues of the since discontinued magazine Woodwork. If you are proficient with the tools at your disposal, the decision to use either hand tools or power tools can be based on pleasure or efficiency. I use a combination of hand and power tools, and my choice … Continue reading Power Tools vs. Hand Tools, and When Can You Modify the Design?

Defects Are Hints For Something Better

In all the creative work I have done with live-edge material, I have always looked at a cut section - where a limb was removed or the material cut to length - as a shortcoming. But recently, I had an epiphany. Like so many of my revelations, this one came while experimenting on a piece … Continue reading Defects Are Hints For Something Better

Willingness to Try

Unlike some, I don't shy away from trying techniques and processes that are new to me. If you rely on somebody to show you how to do something, you may learn how to perform that task proficiently but you may not ever know how to do it another way, or develop your own methods of … Continue reading Willingness to Try