Crossing Joint as Door Joinery

I developed the crossing joint as a possible solution to how conventional joinery results in a disruption of grain along the rails and/or stiles of a frame and panel door.

Cabinet Doors Intersecting

I cut one sample joint, then did some photo manipulation to see how it would look in a similar situation.

First, I looked at the fingers in a horizontal orientation.

Crossing Joint Horizontal

Then I tried the fingers in a vertical orientation.

Crossing Joint Vertical

I liked this second orientation because I felt the inside finger of the stile that extended to cover the end of the rail provided the mental idea of an border and finished off the edge of the door. I suspected that this was because most doors opened horizontally – if this joinery was used where doors opened vertically (e.g. lifted upward), the first orientation might have been preferable.

What do you think?

Links:

Original Joinery – Crossing Joint

This joint was inspired by the realization that joinery used in frame and panel doors always results in a visual discontinuation of the vertical component, whereas the horizontal component usually carries through to an adjacent component.

Using mortise and tenon, bridle, or cope and stick joinery resulted in one member (usually the stile – the vertical member) cutting off the rail – the horizontal member.

Cabinet Doors Intersecting

Mitre joints didn’t harshly interrupt the visual flow, but made the eye turn the corner and follow the door frame.

I wondered if it was possible to make a joint so that both components visually continued through the joint. I started sketching.

This was the first joint that I made, based on that idea. I called it a crossing joint.

Crossing Joint Crossing Joint Scale There was a lot of glue surface, but much of it was long grain to end grain which does not have as much strength when glued together as do two long grain surfaces.

Gluing Crossing Joint

Ryousuke Ohtake – Spiny Lobster

Lobster1

Artist Name:  Ohtake Ryousuke
Title:  Spiny Lobster
Details:  circa 2014 – 31cm – Boxwood, “beard of whale”

Why It’s Notable:

The form of the spiny lobster was impeccably replicated in boxwood.

Lobster2

Lobster3Lobster4

But the realistic appearance wasn’t enough to get recognized as a Notable Inspiration. This was: the joints were carved so they move just like a real lobster would.

This amazing video (duration – 3:04) shows how the lobster moves. Note how the artist holds the part he is working on at the 0:12 mark – so simple!


I think that the ball and sockets are snapped into place.

Lobster5

Fred West Commemorative Tool Chest at Woodworking In America September 12-13, 2014

Fred West Commemorative Tool Chest, photo by Andrew Gore

Fred West Commemorative Tool Chest, photo by Andrew Gore

This artful tool chest contains fine hand tools and media donated by 16 individuals/organizations to honour Fred West who was an amazing supporter of the woodworking hand tool world.

The chest and its contents will be on display at Woodworking In America this September in Scott Meek’s booth. At his booth, you can enter to win it all!

I will be attending the show for Time Warp Tool Works and will be in the booth next to Scott, so when you visit his booth to enter the draw, come say “hi” to me, too.

Links:

Behind the Design

One of the design blogs that I follow, 2Modern, is beginning a new series called Behind the Design with the intent to “tell the story of the person behind the handcrafted pieces on the 2Modern site.”

Their first article is focused on designer/woodworker/maker Andy Johnson.

I will be watching for more of this series, for sure!

Links:

Interesting Turnings

I found these three things to be rather interesting and wanted to share them with you.

Linsey Pollak made a clarinet from a carrot in under five minutes on stage during a TEDx Talk.


My buddy, Mike Flaim, posted a video on his blog of Izzy Swan making a bowl using a table saw.


Lisa Chemerika described how to make a decorative Saueracker shell in a Canadian Woodworking & Home Improvement Magazine article.

Saueracker Shell - Photo by Don Kondra

Saueracker Shell – Photo by Don Kondra

Links:

Beware of Step 27

I just completed a new cribbage board, but this one was made much differently from the others. I scaled up the board, and added a base to transform it into a table.

Cribbage Table 1

I had some fun with the base. For the stretcher, I used the bandsaw to cut three slits of graduated lengths in one end of the stretcher to spread it.

Stretcher Spread

Then, I cut corresponding mortises in the legs and drove the joint together. Yes, it was tricky!

Stretcher Fitted

For the cribbage board top, I bored the 3/8″ holes freehand, using a plunge router. The bit grabbed in one hole, causing a large jagged, spiral hole as I tried to recover.

Step 27

After some deliberation, I decided to fill the hole with clear resin and rebore the hole.

Cribbage Table 6

If you’re in playing in the right-hand track, beware of step 27!

Cribbage Table 4

Find more photos and details of this cribbage table on the Beware of Step 27 product page.

Links:

Overflow, Part XVIII

A number of months ago, a fellow brought me a boxful of old tools and said that he just wanted them to go to good homes where they would be appreciated. In the box were these three saw sets.

(A) Stanley Pistol Grip Saw Set

Despite the worn paint, this saw set works smoothly and has an anvil that can be adjusted from 4-10.

 (B) Swedish Saw Set

This made-in-Sweden saw set operates with a pliers-like movement. An adjustable stop slides up and down to regulate the amount of tooth that gets set.

(C) Taintor Saw Set

This saw set is a pistol-grip design. A rotating anvil allows the user to set it for different sizes of teeth. The handles do not open on their own; I suspect that the spring is simply missing.

If you would like one of these saw sets, please leave a comment below indicating which one you would like (or that you’d be happy with any) by July 11. I will then draw a winner at random. Even if you don’t get one of these items, remember that there is still much more I want to give away.

And if you haven’t already, be sure to subscribe to my blog so you can be notified as soon as I post something new! Please tell your friends about my Overflow program.

Review the details of the Overflow program.

Three New Cribbage Boards

A few weeks ago, I received a phone call from a fellow looking for a retirement gift for one of his employees. He had been looking at my site and had decided on Cribbage Board 11 because he liked the shape.

Cribbage Board 11

Cribbage Board 11 – SOLD!

That sale reduced my inventory to a single cribbage board (#12) and spurred me to make some more.

I made Cribbage Board 13 with three full tracks and a scoring field.

Cribbage Board 13

Cribbage Board 13

For Cribbage Board 14, I tried something new, and isolated the scoring field in a piece of black walnut that I joined onto the end for a different look.

Cribbage Board 14

Cribbage Board 14

The last board to come out of my shop is clean, simple, and I dare say, sexy. Cribbage Board 15 is a beauty, and one of my favourites.

Cribbage Board 15

Cribbage Board 15

PS: Cribbage Board 12 is still available, too.

Cribbage Board 12

Cribbage Board 12

Links:

The Unknown Craftsman: A Japanese Insight into Beauty

I recently finished reading The Unknown Craftsman: A Japanese Insight into Beauty by Sõetsu Yanagi and adapted by Bernard Leach. It explores the circumstances under which beautiful objects are created, and how industrialization has influenced handmade craft.

I began taking down quotations that were interesting and worthy of sharing, but soon found myself jotting down entire paragraphs. So, rather than rewrite the book, I will merely point you towards the chapters which I found most interesting.

  • The Beauty of Irregularity (page 117);
  • The Buddhist Idea of Beauty (page 127);
  • Hakeme (page 171);
  • The Way of Craftsmanship (page 197); and
  • The Responsibility of the Craftsman (page 216).

This book has been added to my list of Recommended Readings.