Knotty Pine

This question kept me awake in the wee hours one morning:

What would it look like if I carved a knot in a piece of wood?

I lay in bed trying to visualize it, and figure out how best to attempt it… Start by finding a fairly thick piece of rope, tie a knot, use it to layout the carving, rough-out the carving with a saw, then finish carving with a knife and/or gouges.

Tracing the imaginary path of the rope with my index finger while laying on my back, I rehearsed the carving over and over, over and over.

At the first semi-reasonable hour, I got out of bed and went down to the shop to find an appropriate piece of wood to carve. I found a clear piece of Austrian pine, salvaged from a piece of 6×8 dunnage in a container of Felder machines.

I tied a knot in a short length of 3/8” rope and used a pen to roughly indicate the path of the rope on each of the four faces of the blank.

Using a jigsaw and long blade, I cut to my layout lines. Then I completed the shaping with my folding carving knife.

And that is how you turn a clear piece of pine into a piece of knotty pine.

C4DA96C0-E1A6-4929-8106-F38BE4D090DF.jpeg

Breaking Down Slabs

The large majority of the wood that I have is sawn in slabs. While the live edges allow more design possibilities, there are times when I don’t need them.

Breaking Down Locust1

Layout

To process this slab, I start by aligning my straight edge just inside the bark. This results in the straightest grain with the least amount of waste. This wood is black locust, which I really like using. My sculpture, Something Like That is made of the same species.

Breaking Down Locust2

I use a carpenter’s pencil to transfer the location of the straight edge onto the slab.

Breaking Down Locust3

Cutting

Then, I use my circular saw to make the cut. For large, heavy slabs, I prefer to use portable power tools to break down slabs into more manageable pieces. I use a circular saw when possible for efficiency, and a jigsaw for material thicker than 2.5 inches, or curved cuts (e.g. Relationship Study).

If the material is more manageable, I usually turn to my bandsaw for breaking down rough stock, mostly because it is safer to use with unflattened parts than the table saw.

Breaking Down Locust4

Due to the dusty nature of this operation, I prefer to do this work outside, weather permitting. It creates a lot of dust, and if there isn’t a breeze carrying away the dust, I try to hold by breath for the duration of the cut. Unfortunately, I can’t hold my breath for the two-minutes  it takes to cut through seven feet of 2.5 inch thick hardwood.

Breaking Down Locust5

If the saw doesn’t make it all the way through, I usually finish with a hand saw. I find it quite enjoyable pretending to make the entire cut with a hand saw at an amazing speed.

Breaking Down Locust6

This edge needs to be jointed to make it smooth and straight. Note that even if the cut surface is perfectly smooth and straight, I still check it a few days later to ensure that the wood hasn’t moved after being released from the rest of the slab.

Breaking Down Locust7Here’s the yield (minus the long piece at the back which is my straight edge). I will allow them to acclimate and stabilize before processing them further into rails and cross members for my vehicle’s roof rack.

Breaking Down Locust9

What a Mess

As I broke down the slab, I was aware of the massive amount of dust I was creating. My circular saw, which takes a 0.069″ kerf, removed 125 cubic inches of material. That’s equivalent to a 5 inch cube – a lot of dust to throw around.

The Festool TS 75 Track Saw is starting to make a lot of sense to me. Not only does it have provisions for dust collection, the saw has over 3 inches of cutting capacity and leaves a much better cut surface. Using a rail to guide the saw allows me to make perfectly straight cuts, resulting in less clean-up. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’d like to wash the sawdust out from between my toes.

Links

More Multi-Layer Jigsaw Puzzles

Big or small – I make them all!

Last year I made two large, complex and challenging jigsaw puzzles with 90 and 140 pieces, respectively. Making a puzzle involves cutting out sections of pieces, turning them on edge, cutting them again, turning each section another time and making more cuts. The result is a pile of very intricate and highly unique puzzle pieces.

90-Piece Puzzle2

90-Piece Puzzle

140-Piece Puzzle2

140-Piece Puzzle

The large puzzles were impressive and the sheer number of pieces would have intimidated even a die-hard puzzler (or even its maker!). For that reason, I decided to make some smaller puzzles.

18-Piece Puzzles

These puzzles are smaller (roughly 2-3/4″ x 2-3/4″ x 1″) and have fewer pieces but are no less intricate or tricky than the larger ones.

A single is a great introduction to my multi-layer puzzles, and the difficulty can be increased by disassembling two or more into one pile of pieces.

I am offering them individually for $30 each, or $75 for three.

By the way, the two large puzzles are still for sale at this time as I write this article.

18-Piece Puzzles

18-Piece Puzzles

Links:

Market Test Reveals Public Perception of Puzzles

This past weekend, I spent my time at Gallery Bistro demonstrating how I make my 3D jigsaw puzzles. It was a fun and rewarding experience for me and I learned a lot about how the public viewed my puzzles and pricing.

18-Piece Puzzles

3x3x2 (18-Piece) Puzzles

Almost everybody was interested in what I was doing and creating. I showed them the scroll saw blade that I use and explained how I make a 3D puzzle. Although they appreciated what I was doing, most of them were too intimidated by the 18-piece puzzles to attempt to even take one apart. A few people did successfully solve a puzzle and they, interestingly, did not seem inclined to purchase a puzzle. Those who did were buying them as gifts for puzzle-lovers on their list.

This test of making and selling puzzles gave me the confidence to move forward with them. I intend to market them more aggressively next year.

A Little Less Insanity: A 90-Piece, Layered Jigsaw Puzzle

There is now another wooden 3D puzzle on my Gallery page.  Like big brother, the 140-piece monster, this one also has multiple layers.  However, it has only 90 pieces, so it should be a cinch to complete, relatively speaking!

Like puzzles?  Come try one this weekend only at Gallery Bistro (2411 Clarke Street, Port Moody).  Opening hours are 10am-3pm on Saturday, December 14 and Sunday, December 15.

90-Piece Puzzle2

90-Piece Puzzle, partially disassembled

90-Piece Puzzle1

90-Piece Puzzle

Links:

Get Personal with Insanity

I will be making and selling my wooden 3D jigsaw puzzles at Gallery Bistro (2411 Clarke Street, Port Moody) Saturday, December 14 and Sunday, December 15 from 10am-3pm.

Sometimes I describe my work as that which is so insane nobody in their right mind would attempt it. My wooden 3D jigsaw puzzles are examples of that.

My latest offering is a small puzzle comprised of 18 pieces. They are simple enough to not be too intimidating, yet complex enough to keep someone engaged. The neat thing about these puzzles is that the difficulty can be increased by combining the unassembled pieces of multiple puzzles in the same jumble.

cropped-18-piece-puzzle2.jpg

Gallery Bistro is a great place for breakfast (how about the classic eggs benny?), lunch (my latest favourite is the shrimp and avocado sandwich!), or a drink to warm your belly (chai tea, anyone?). It is also a vital part of the community. They display the work of local artists and allow groups such as Inlet Artists and the organizing team of Kaboom! The Port Moody Art Explosion (all of which I am a member), to hold meetings there.

18-Piece Puzzles

Five 18-Piece Puzzles

Links:

How I Prefer to Make Speculative Work

When not required to make something that meets a certain set of criteria, I am free to let the design evolve on its own. Sometimes (but not often), I end up making nothing more than scrap wood and sawdust. That’s how it goes sometimes.

I feel that this quote embodies my philosophy on making speculative work (for starters).

“A good traveller has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving.”

– Lao Tzu

This is also how I make my jigsaw puzzles. I start with nothing more than a piece of wood and a new blade in my scroll saw. I don’t draw a pattern so I have no lines to follow. I just make one cut at a time. Once I free a piece (or section) from the rest, I proceed to cut it into smaller pieces, making cuts from the edge, end or face.

The result in a very complex puzzle with pieces that must be assembled in the correct sequence. For example, when viewed from the top,this section appears to be three pieces.

140-Piece Puzzle1

However, it is actually made of nine pieces which slide together. Reassembling these nine pieces alone takes several minutes. Can you imagine if they were mixed among a hundred other puzzle pieces?

140-Piece Puzzle2

This 3D puzzle is made up of sections one to four layers deep. That is how the complexity of the puzzle is hidden. Would you have guessed that this puzzle is comprised of 140 pieces?

140-Piece Puzzle Top

This puzzle is for sale and all the details can be found on the product page. Please contact me if you are interested in acquiring it.

Links:

Mechanical Puzzle Box

After Woodworking in America, I hitched a ride to Phoenix with Paul-Marcel.  In his shop, I built a puzzle box with a mechanical lock.

In this video, I demonstrate the operation of the box while talking about wooden jigsaw puzzles and the design and construction of the box.  (Duration – 10:04)


Read about another of my wooden jigsaw puzzles, Diamond Challenge, and watch a video of the assembly HERE.

Maple Trestle Table, Session 11 – Straight Lines on Wonky Surfaces

On the morning of Sunday, April 15th, Morton and I exchanged ideas about trestle tables, spurred on by a recent sketch of a table on which he was working.  That got me yearning to build a trestle table.

I documented my progress live on Twitter which was useful because each update had a time stamp so followers could see the rate at which I progressed.  Here is a list of the previous Sessions:

Session 1 – Flat Boards are Boring;
Session 2 – Playing with Slabs;
Session 3 – From Two Slabs to One Table Top;
Session 4 – Clamping Odd Shapes and Sketching on Wood;
Session 5 – Routing Pockets for Battens;
Session 6 – Making Battens and Installing Countertop Connectors;
Session 7 – Installing Battens and Flattening the Underside;
Session 8 – Make Your Tools Work for You and Flattening the Top;
Session 9 – Mortises the Slow Way (or Why I’m Buying a Domino XL); and
Session 10 – Curvy Legs are Always Good.

(If you are not familiar with the format used on Twitter, every update, or “tweet” below starts with a username, being the author of that tweet.  Sometimes, you see two or more usernames in a tweet.  The second (and third, etc) usernames are preceded by a @ symbol and are people to whom the author is talking.  The other symbol you see is #, which serves as a category.  I try to remember to categorize all my tweets pertaining to this project under #flairww.)

FlairWoodworks I’m back in the shop at 11am sharp! Should I tackle this stretcher issue? #flairww -11:00 AM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I realized this morning that I’d made an error in laying out the angle of the legs. #flairww -11:23 AM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I had laid out the angle of the leg so that it would be centred at the bottom of the foot, not the top where it enters. #flairww -11:24 AM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks However, this means that the leg leans even more and does not make it any easier to join the stretcher. #flairww -11:25 AM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks This is turning into a mental challenge. Thankfully it does not involve numbers like @HalfInchShy’s project#flairww-11:27 AM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Here, the centre of the leg where it enters the foot is centred over its position on the batten. #flairww -11:33 AM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I spent an hour on the phone with my partner @GarthTW2 discussing some new products we’re planning. Back to the table now. #flairww-12:31 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks The shaded area represents the space that would be occupied by the wide end of the stretcher. #flairww -12:47 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks The other end is much smaller and should not be a problem. #flairww -12:47 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Of course, I’ll cut tenons on the stretcher so that I don’t need to remove so much material from the leg. #flairww -12:48 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m confident that this angle for the legs will work so I’m going to go make the cut. Again, I’ll use my sliding table saw. #flairww -12:55 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m ready to make the cut. The slider guarantees the cuts will be in a straight line. #flairww -1:00 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Here’s the completed cut. I will cut the other end later. #flairww -1:01 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks While I’m thinking about what to do next for this leg, I’ll lay out and cut the angle of the other leg. #flairww -1:06 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks By the way, I’m making this table 43″ tall. #flairww -1:09 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks No I’m not. I’m making the table 29″ tall. I just wanted to see if anybody was paying attention. #flairww -1:10 PM May 2nd, 2012

LornaBourke @FlairWoodworks Chris, I’m following but I didn’t catch the start so I didn’t know how tall the table is #youarenotalone #flairww -1:15 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks @LornaBourke Well, 43″ would be a very tall table. It would be unusual to say the least. Thanks for following! #flairww -1:17 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Both legs are now cut! #flairww -1:19 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I had left one part of the leg thicker to allow some sculpting, but it’s a problem now. #flairww -1:22 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks PS: Like my workbench? Working on the ground, Japanese-style. #flairww -1:22 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Before planing the face, I wrapped the layout lines over to the edges to preserve them. #flairww -1:26 PM May 2nd, 2012

Morton @FlairWoodworks 29″ high is what my current dining table project is going to be also. -1:28 PM May 2nd, 2012

luggermatt @FlairWoodworks I spend half my time working on the ground! It saves picking stuff up.. ;-) -1:30 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I don’t like it so far. #flairww RT @luggermatt:@FlairWoodworks I spend half my time working on the ground! It saves picking stuff up.. ;-) -1:32 PM May 2nd, 2012

luggermatt @FlairWoodworks When the timber you’re working with is 15ft lengths of 2″x8″ oak it’s easier. Move the machine to it too ;-) -1:32 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks @luggermatt Well, yeah. -1:32 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks There – it’s leveled. Not my idea of fun… #flairww -1:42 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Now I need to re-establish my layout lines. #flairww -1:43 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m working on how to position the stretcher. Here, the midpoint of each end is at the same height. #flairww -1:59 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Note that about 10″ will be cut off of the left side. #flairww -1:59 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m standing back and having a drink of water while I analyze the stretcher’s positioning. Should I make one end higher? #flairww -2:00 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I have longer and shorter levels but the 2′ level gets the most use. An 18″ level might be nice. #flairww -2:04 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve decided to go forwards with the balanced positioning of the stretcher. I used the level to mark plumb lines on each end. #flairww -2:05 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks If my shop were wide enough, I could crosscut the stretcher with my sliding table saw. #flairww -2:09 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Since my shop is not that wide, my options include my compound mitre saw, jigsaw, or handsaw. #flairww -2:09 PM May 2nd, 2012

BourbonCremeBot RT @FlairWoodworks I sure could use a Bourbon Creme about now #flairww -2:14 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m opting to use the jigsaw. I clamped a piece of plywood to the top of the stretcher. #flairww -2:21 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks The plywood provides a smooth, even surface on which the jigsaw can ride without getting caught. #flairww -2:22 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks The trouble with non-flat stock is that it always wants to move. You have to secure it really well. #flairww -2:23 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Well, that certainly wasn’t the best cut I’ve ever done. But it’s good enough since it will be trimmed later. #flairww -2:27 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks So… how do I cut parallel tenons on either end of a long, non-flat, curved, stretcher? #flairww -2:29 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I know I can figure out a way to cut the tenons, but if you have an idea, I’m listening! #flairww -2:30 PM May 2nd, 2012

msnodgrass2 @FlairWoodworks would snapping chalk lines help? I didn’t see the stretcher -2:33 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I don’t think so. #flairww RT@msnodgrass2: @FlairWoodworks would snapping chalk lines help? I didn’t see the stretcher -2:34 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks @msnodgrass2 It’s more the general wonkiness, rather than the curve that makes it difficult. #flairww -2:35 PM May 2nd, 2012

kring_l @FlairWoodworks long semi flexible strait edge for the face but not sure 4 the ends -2:36 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Would that make it semi-straight? #flairww RT @kring_l:@FlairWoodworks long semi flexible strait edge for the face but not sure 4 the ends -2:38 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks The positioning of my saw horses indicates that my shop may be a little crowded. #flairww -2:39 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks My winding sticks show the twist in the stretcher from one end to the other. #flairww -2:43 PM May 2nd, 2012

kring_l @flairwoodworks no the edge stays strait the face can bow I use a 4 foot aluminum ruler type strait edge -2:45 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Gotcha. #flairww RT @kring_l: no the edge stays strait the face can bow I use a 4 foot aluminum ruler type strait edge -2:45 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I realized that the twist could help me if it twisted in the right direction. But it doesn’t. #flairww -2:49 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m using the short fence on my table saw to crosscut parts for my tenoning jig to a consistent length. #flairww -2:59 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve marked the direction of grain runout on the jig parts. In this direction, the wood planes cleanly. #flairww -3:04 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I like to assemble my jigs with screws so I can later take them apart and reuse the parts. #flairww -3:19 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks (Have you ever seen an uglier jig?) #flairww -3:19 PM May 2nd, 2012

HalfInchShy @FlairWoodworks That doesn’t look bad at all! Put a flair mark on it :) #flairww -3:23 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Yuk yuk yuk! RT @HalfInchShy: @FlairWoodworks That doesn’t look bad at all! Put a flair mark on it :) #flairww -3:23 PM May 2nd, 2012

HalfInchShy @FlairWoodworks The one from the Ceros demo #flairww -3:24 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I jointed the edge of the jig square to the face. The jig is now done. #flairww -3:24 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks @HalfInchShy I don’t follow… #flairww -3:24 PM May 2nd, 2012

HalfInchShy @FlairWoodworks In ur Ceros sanding demo, u made a flair mark to be sanded; add 2 here to make it moe betta (asymmetrical of course #flairww -3:25 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks @HalfInchShy Good call. It looks much better now. #flairww -3:28 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks With the jig clamped to the stretcher, I now have parallel reference surfaces on each side. #flairww -3:29 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Okay – lunch time! #flairww -3:30 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Darn it… somebody tracked sawdust into the house again. Hey – don’t look at me! #flairww -3:33 PM May 2nd, 2012

DyamiPlotke @FlairWoodworks my 24″ level sees the most time too. -4:33 PM May 2nd, 2012

DyamiPlotke @FlairWoodworks mark 1 w/ a level. Go across w/ a straight edge, adjust height as desired & level the 2nd one. -4:40 PM May 2nd, 2012

HalfInchShy @FlairWoodworks Bet you could go for some Bourbon Cream right about now… #flairww -4:46 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m back in the shop and I’ll set up to rout the first tenon. #Woodchat starts in 20 minutes. #flairww -5:40 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks There is no way I’ll be able to rout the full length of the tenons without a wider router baseplate. #flairww -5:45 PM May 2nd, 2012

bourboncreambot RT @HalfInchShy @FlairWoodworks Bet you could go for some Bourbon Cream right about now… #flairww -5:46 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Rather than make an offset router baseplate, I’m going to use a router attached to a table insert. #flairww -5:48 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks That’s right, @HalfInchShy – I don’t mess around! #flairww -5:48 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve got the jig set up and router bit installed. Next, I need to figure out how deep to set the bit. #flairww -5:56 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks How do these proportions look? When dealing with large tenons, I leave the tenon a bit thicker than 1/3. #flairww -6:01 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Time for #woodchat. Feel free to join in on Twitter! I’ll resume the project in one hour. #flairww -6:01 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks Ok, #woodchat crew. I need to go rout some tenons with my inverted router table. #flairww -6:59 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I did what I could with my routers (more router frustrations). I’ll do the rest by hand. #flairww -7:37 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks You want a challenge? Clamp this stretcher solidly! #flairww -8:00 PM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ll finish fine-tuning the first tenon after dinner. #flairww -8:05 PM May 2nd, 2012

Hey – the next day is “after dinner” too.

While you’re waiting for me to return from my dinner break, please leave a comment.

Maple Trestle Table, Session 10 – Curvy Legs are Always Good

On the morning of Sunday, April 15th, Morton and I exchanged ideas about trestle tables, spurred on by a recent sketch of a table on which he was working.  That got me yearning to build a trestle table.

I documented my progress live on Twitter which was useful because each update had a time stamp so followers could see the rate at which I progressed.  Here is a list of the previous Sessions:

Session 1 – Flat Boards are Boring;
Session 2 – Playing with Slabs;
Session 3 – From Two Slabs to One Table Top;
Session 4 – Clamping Odd Shapes and Sketching on Wood;
Session 5 – Routing Pockets for Battens;
Session 6 – Making Battens and Installing Countertop Connectors;
Session 7 – Installing Battens and Flattening the Underside;
Session 8 – Make Your Tools Work for You and Flattening the Top; and
Session 9 – Mortises the Slow Way (or Why I’m Buying a Domino XL).

(If you are not familiar with the format used on Twitter, every update, or “tweet” below starts with a username, being the author of that tweet.  Sometimes, you see two or more usernames in a tweet.  The second (and third, etc) usernames are preceded by a @ symbol and are people to whom the author is talking.  The other symbol you see is #, which serves as a category.  I try to remember to categorize all my tweets pertaining to this project under #flairww.)

FlairWoodworks The rain’s coming down hard in Port Moody and I’m back in the shop working on the trestle table. Follow along as I start the base! #flairww -12:13 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m laying out the base components on these four pieces of maple. #flairww -12:22 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve been looking at this leg I roughly cut, trying to decide if it looks too big. #flairww -12:47 PM May 1st, 2012

ravinheart @FlairWoodworks first impressions … my vote is Not too big #flairww -12:56 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks So I cut the legs and they still feel lacking. I think I need curved legs instead of straight legs. #flairww -1:12 PM May 1st, 2012

ravinheart @FlairWoodworks yup … curvy legs are always good :) #flairww -1:13 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’d describe what I want to do, but it will be easier and more clear if I just do it. #flairww -1:15 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks The hose feels like it’s fighting me so I’m going to reattach it to the ceiling. #flairww -1:33 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I had taken the hose down from the ceiling so that I could reach all the way across the shop when I cut the edges of the table top. #flairww -1:33 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks That’s better. #flairww -1:37 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Dust collection on the Festool Trion jigsaw is not great, even with the dust shroud in place. #flairww -1:39 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks However, the orbital feature is terrific. Cuts are very quick when the saw is set to a full orbital stroke. #flairww -1:40 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Here’s what I want to do. #flairww -1:49 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I scribed a line along the leg where I need to cut the curved brace. What’s the easiest way to do the cut? #flairww -1:52 PM May 1st, 2012

ravinheart @FlairWoodworks Start on the Bandsaw or by hand ? #flairww -1:54 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks This is how I’d make the cut. #flairww -1:54 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Perfect! #flairww -1:56 PM May 1st, 2012

ravinheart @FlairWoodworks Oh ya you got the slider … nice #flairww -1:57 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I also need to make a cut square to the last. This could not be more simple. #flairww -1:57 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks @ravinheart The sliding table saw makes this stuff TOO EASY. #flairww -2:00 PM May 1st, 2012

Tooltutor @FlairWoodworks That’s a sweet slider! -2:01 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks This is the basic idea. #flairww -2:02 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I love having it! #flairww RT @Tooltutor: @FlairWoodworks That’s a sweet slider! -2:02 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Anybody out there have a track saw? How easy would it be to make these two cuts perfectly square in 2-1/2″ thick maple? #flairww -2:04 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I could also lean it over like this. Any thoughts? #flairww -2:07 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Yay – it’s sunny outside now! #flairww -2:12 PM May 1st, 2012

DyamiPlotke @FlairWoodworks I have a track saw, but I’d leave that cut to my miter or table saws. -2:12 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Why? #flairww RT @DyamiPlotke: @FlairWoodworks I have a track saw, but I’d leave that cut to my miter or table saws. -2:12 PM May 1st, 2012

DyamiPlotke @FlairWoodworks I like [the lean]. -2:12 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Ha! Now I need to find another piece of maple with curved grain! #flairww -2:15 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I broke another blade. After breaking the first blade, I backed off the side guides a little. What gives? #flairww -2:21 PM May 1st, 2012

Tooltutor @FlairWoodworks u could do it with a track saw with the accuracy of your square though I’d def prefer a table or miter if it fits -2:27 PM May 1st, 2012

Tooltutor @FlairWoodworks you’re getting too buff man-handling those bigass slabs, snapping blades like toothpicks -2:30 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks @Tooltutor Yeah, that’s the problem :) #flairww -2:33 PM May 1st, 2012

DyamiPlotke @FlairWoodworks Easier to determine right angles, less setup and greater depth of cut. -2:35 PM May 1st, 2012

DyamiPlotke @FlairWoodworks yes, I do [like the leaning leg design]. -2:35 PM May 1st, 2012

Tooltutor @DyamiPlotke @flairwoodworks seconded  -2:36 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Before installing a third blade, I decided to see if I could find some more information on the set up of the jigsaw guides. #flairww -2:36 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Unfortunately, the written instructions for the @FestoolUSA Trion Jigsaw are not very comprehensive. #flairww -2:37 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks But I did find a good video by @FestoolUSA on Festool Owners Group.  I did not know to pull the arbor shaft down (1:20). #flairww -2:38 PM May 1st, 2012

Tbdi0629 @FlairWoodworks I totally use my track saw for cutting slabs.-2:45 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Did you see my application?  #flairwwRT @Tbdi0629: @FlairWoodworks I totally use my track saw for cutting slabs.-2:47 PM May 1st, 2012

Tbdi0629 @FlairWoodworks yep, that’s a slick way to do it if you have that option. -2:50 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I noticed that one of the dust extraction ports in the jigsaw’s shoe is clogged. I’ve had this before. #flairww -2:58 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Would it be as easy with a track saw? #flairww RT @Tbdi0629: @FlairWoodworks yep, that’s a slick way to do it if you have that option. -3:00 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I was unable to clear the blockage just by digging at it with a pencil, as I’ve done in the past. #flairww -3:01 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I removed the shoe to expose the blockage. #flairww -3:04 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I picked up an assortment pack of bits a number of years ago which included hex and Torx drivers. Very useful. #flairww -3:08 PM May 1st, 2012

Tbdi0629 @FlairWoodworks That’s a great debate evoking question! :) but I would say yes. -3:19 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Here are the two legs roughly positioned. I’m going with the lean. #flairww -3:26 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks What would be the argument for “no”? #flairww RT@Tbdi0629: @FlairWoodworks That’s a great debate evoking question! :) but I would say yes. -3:27 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Lunch time. #flairww -3:30 PM May 1st, 2012

Tbdi0629 @FlairWoodworks I’m not sure, maybe someone would rather rig up a jig for their tablesaw or bandsaw or etc. but me… I prefer my festool [track saw]. -3:33 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks @Tbdi0629 The trouble is, a typical 10″ tablesaw has a capacity of about 2-1/2″ and a jig reduces that. #flairww -3:35 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks @Tbdi0629 And a bandsaw doesn’t give the same quality of cut. #flairww -3:35 PM May 1st, 2012

Tbdi0629 @FlairWoodworks yep, my thoughts exactly. -3:40 PM May 1st, 2012

Tumblewood: YES!!! The White Trash Boom Arm!! RT @FlairWoodworks: The hose feels like its fighting me so I’m going to reattach it to the ceiling. #flairww -4:03 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Ah, and there’s the inventor! #flairww RT @Tumblewood: YES!!! The White Trash Boom Arm!! -4:08 PM May 1st, 2012

Tumblewood The table is looking awesome, Chris! RT @FlairWoodworks: Ah, and there’s the inventor! #flairww RT @Tumblewood: YES!!! The White Trash Boom Arm!! -4:09 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Thanks, Vic! I’m enjoying the creative process building the base! RT @Tumblewood: The table is looking awesome, Chris! #flairww -4:10 PM May 1st, 2012

kring_l:@FlairWoodworks good call with the lean are you matching both sides or opposing? -4:26 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks They lean in opposing directions. #flairww RT @kring_l:@FlairWoodworks good call with the lean are you matching both sides or opposing? -4:30 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks @kring_l Remember the spin match I used for the top? I’d like to match that. #flairww -4:31 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks My lunch break is done! I need to figure out how much the legs should lean, then join the braces and cut the tops flat. #flairww -4:33 PM May 1st, 2012

Black_SheepWW @Tumblewood @FlairWoodworks Did you have to extend the length of the hose for this? I’m fighting mine when sanding. Needs to be hanging. -4:33 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks @Black_SheepWW Definitely. I have a 36mm hose, then a 27mm hose off of that. Each are 3m long, I think. #flairww -4:34 PM May 1st, 2012

Tumblewood Dental picks!! RT @FlairWoodworks: I was unable to clear the blockage just by digging at it with a pencil, as I’ve done in the past. #flairww -4:41 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Ha! I’d never used this square since I bought it 4 years ago and was thinking of “Overflowing” it. #flairww -4:43 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks It turns out to be the perfect tool for this! #flairww -4:43 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks My next step is to joint one face flat and plane the other parallel. #flairww -4:45 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I still don’t have a Domino XL (or even @tumblewood’s M600). Fortunately, 50mm x 10mm Domino tenons will work. #flairww -4:57 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Before cutting joinery, I need to fair the inside edge. #flairww -4:59 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I used my #3 bench plane, which affords a more comfortable two-handed grip than my block plane. #flairww -5:06 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks There’s some pretty figure on this edge. Too bad that it’s one of the least visible parts. #flairww -5:10 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I put a pencil line across the joint where I want the Domino tenons. #flairww -5:21 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve got the mortises bored. Time for a dry-fit. #flairww -5:38 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Okay, I’m going for the glue-up now. #flairww -5:39 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks But first, I need to get the joint apart and remove the Domino tenons… #flairww -5:41 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I bought these Extractor pliers for pulling nails. I use them for pulling Domino tenons. #flairww -5:44 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Angles are always a challenge to clamp. Here’s the caul I used. #flairww -6:00 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Now I’ll work on the second leg. #flairww -6:04 PM May 1st, 2012

Tbdi0629 @FlairWoodworks I have a set of “test” dominos I have sanded down, to use in my test fits. I marked them black. -6:08 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve got the parts for the second leg surfaced. Now I need to lay out and cut the joinery. #flairww -6:15 PM May 1st, 2012

DyamiPlotke @FlairWoodworks I use pliers to pull Dominos too. -6:21 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Just like on the other leg, the inside curve has beautiful grain. And it’s hidden. #flairww -6:25 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Time for another dry fit. I don’t put Domino tenons in the oversized mortises for the dry run. #flairww -6:34 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve laid out another angled caul for the other leg. #flairww -6:39 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Okay, time for the second glue-up session! #flairww -6:44 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Another successful glue-up with the right amount of glue squeeze-out. #flairww -6:53 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I kept glue away from the left side of the joint near the inside corner so I wouldn’t have to clean it up later. #flairww -6:54 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Time to clean up the workshop a bit. #flairww -6:59 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Fun fact: I had considered using metal legs like these#flairww -7:11 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Time to go make dinner. #flairww -7:12 PM May 1st, 2012

Tumblewood @FlairWoodworks I can see that shape for the legs, but would prefer them from wood. #flairww -7:40 PM May 1st, 2012

kring_l @FlairWoodworks I agree with @Tumblewood the metal would take away from all the work you put into the top -7:51 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks It wasn’t that much work. Okay, it was. #flairww RT @kring_l the metal would take away from all the work you put into the top @Tumblewood -9:02 PM May 1st, 2012

Tumblewood A nice piece will have people crawling to check it out. The detail will not be in vain. RT @FlairWoodworks: Just like on the other leg, the inside curve has beautiful grain. And it’s hidden. #flairww

FlairWoodworks Okay… I’m back in the shop after dinner. I’ll start by unclamping the legs and cleaning off the excess glue. #flairww -10:09 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks It seems Twitter on my phone won’t post tweets with pictures after 8pm. Here comes a backlog of Tweets… #flairww -10:39 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks This is how I’m laying out the top and bottom cuts to ensure the leg is centred on the foot. #flairww -10:40 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks The arm looks overly heavy and I’ll probably trim it down a little. I’m not sure how yet, though. #flairww -10:41 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks This is how it will look installed, only the leg will be on the batten, not behind it. #flairww -10:42 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m using my spokeshave to refine the curve of the arm.#flairww -10:42 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks The curve of this section is too severe for my flat spokeshave. I don’t have a convex spokeshave. #flairww -10:44 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I can, however, cheat a little by extending the spokeshave’s blade out a little further. #flairww -10:44 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve switched to carving gouges to blend the arm into the leg.#flairww -10:52 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I worked across the grain with three gouges of different sweeps to begin blending the arm into the leg. #flairww -10:58 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m working on the second leg where the same things need to be done. #flairww -11:20 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks With the opposing angles of the legs, attaching the stretcher will be interesting, to say the least. #flairww -11:37 PM May 1st, 2012

luggermatt @FlairWoodworks Certainly looks fun :-) -11:38 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Hmmm. I’ll let you know if it was when I’m finished! #flairww RT@luggermatt: @FlairWoodworks Certainly looks fun :-) -11:38 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks If only I could twist the stretcher… #flairww -11:39 PM May 1st, 2012

FlairWoodworks Okay, that’s a good place to stop tonight. To be continued…#flairww -11:50 PM May 1st, 2012

Morton @Tbdi0629 @flairwoodworks hahah – I have the exact same [test dominos], with the exact same black markings ;) heh. -4:06 AM May 2nd, 2012

Tbdi0629 @Morton That’s funny! But then again, what’s the saying about minds that think alike….hmmm :) -7:09 AM May 2nd, 2012

McPhersonDoug @FlairWoodworks Really enjoying following ur VERY cool table build. Thanks for tweeting your progress. Great stuff. #woodchat -6:19 AM May 2nd, 2012

FlairWoodworks @Tbdi0629 @Morton I had a set of Dominos that I’d sanded down too. I dyed my set red. #flairww -9:38 AM May 2nd, 2012

In Session 11, I did more work on the legs and began work on the stretcher-to-leg joinery.