Maple Trestle Table, Session 2 – Playing with Slabs

On the morning of Sunday, April 15th, Morton and I exchanged ideas about trestle tables, spurred on by a recent sketch of a table on which he was working.  That got me yearning to build a trestle table.

I documented my progress live on Twitter which was useful because each update had a time stamp so followers could see the rate at which I progressed.  Here is a link to the previous session.

Session 1 – Flat Boards are Boring

(If you are not familiar with the format used on Twitter, every update, or “tweet” below starts with a username, being the author of that tweet.  Sometimes, you see two or more usernames in a tweet.  The second (and third, etc) usernames are preceded by a @ symbol and are people to whom the author is talking.  The other symbol you see is #, which serves as a category.  I try to remember to categorize all my tweets pertaining to this project under #flairww.)

FlairWoodworks I like the split but it’s best shown on the side where the lower half protrudes further. #flairww -11:18 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks The split is barely noticeable on this side. I’m going to change that by reducing the thickness of the top. #flairww -11:21 AM Apr 16th, 2012

cobwobbler @FlairWoodworks why do defects look so cool? -11:23 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m going to use mu angle grinder with an Arbortech wood-carving wheel. #flairww -11:23 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Because they are unique! RT @cobwobbler: @FlairWoodworks why do defects look so cool? -11:26 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I would normally do the outside but it’s raining today. I put up tarps to contain the mess. #flairww -11:26 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I wear tight-fitting gloves, goggles, ear protection and a dust mask when power carving. #flairww -11:27 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Here you can see the effect that I’m going for. #flairww -11:40 AM Apr 16th, 2012

Morton @FlairWoodworks Tarp doesn’t look like it’s doing much ;) -11:48 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks The shape is established. Now for sanding. #flairww -11:54 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Here’s the pile of shavings I produced. #flairww -11:57 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Notice that they are shavings, not dust. #flairww -11:58 AM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks They actually worked perfectly! RT @Morton: @FlairWoodworks Tarp doesn’t look like it’s doing much ;) -11:59 AM Apr 16th, 2012

BillGriggs @FlairWoodworks Clean it up with a Dust Deputy. -12:01 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Nah. One scoop with the dust pan and it’s gone. RT @BillGriggs: @FlairWoodworks Clean it up with a Dust Deputy. -12:03 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I put the round blade of my convex palm plane in my flat palm plane to quickly even the surface. #flairww -12:08 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks To work a concave surface, either a short-soled plane works well. For more severe concave areas, I’d use the round plane. #flairww -12:09 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks A plane works more quickly than a sander and does a better job of fairing the curve. #flairww -12:12 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks With a sharp blade set for a fine cut, the plane even handles knots with ease. #flairww -12:19 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I have no problem working to within 1/16″ with the angle grinder which means less cleanup later. #flairww -12:22 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I follow up with 80-grit on the sander to further refine the surface and remove any tearout. #flairww -12:32 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks It doesn’t look right. More shaping is required. #flairww -12:49 PM Apr 16th, 2012

BCcraftmaster @FlairWoodworks I like your saw horse set up. -12:50 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworksI can’t say enough about them. They are so versatile. RT @BCcraftmaster: @FlairWoodworks I like your saw horse set up. -1:00 PM Apr 16, 2012

FlairWoodworks My palm plane is too short to remove this hump so I’m switching to a longer plane. #flairww -1:17 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Perfect! #flairww -1:20 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks If it feels fair, it’s fair. #flairww -1:37 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I use a thin-bladed knife to clear loose material out of the cracks. #flairww -1:39 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I broke off the end of a hacksaw blade to clean out the cracks. It’s longer and more flexible than my knife. #flairww -1:48 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m using this wooden block plane. It’s less fatiguing to use than metal planes, especially one-handed. #flairww -2:00 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks It was the first plane I’d ever made. It works well, but the body needs some shaping. #flairww -2:01 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks You should never hesitate to modify your tools if it makes them work better for you. #flairww -2:09 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I also rounded over one edge of the sole where my fingers curl over. #flairww -2:10 PM Apr 16th, 2012

CashFromCraft RT @FlairWoodworks: You should never hesitate to modify your tools if it makes them work better for you. #flairww -2:11 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks That feels so nice! #flairww -2:11 PM Apr 16th, 2012

CashFromCraft @FlairWoodworks especially shop made tools! – 2:11 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Especially! But by no means only. RT @CashFromCraft: @FlairWoodworks especially shop made tools! – 2:12 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I used my block plane to begin rounding over the edges. I’m using my sander with foam interface pad to finish. #flairww -2:47 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks The stretcher is done… at least for now. #flairww-3:04 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks And here’s a look at the other side. #flairww -3:04 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Time for a lunch break. #flairww -3:05 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Any comments or questions so far? #flairww -3:06 PM Apr 16th, 2012

Tumblewood They are tools, after all!! RT @FlairWoodworks: You should never hesitate to modify your tools if it makes them work better for you. #flairww

FlairWoodworks Now that lunch is finished, I’m looking for materials for the rest of this table now that the stretcher is done. #flairww -4:54 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Playing with bookmatches for the top (like @Mansfinefurn). I have three slabs with which to work. #flairww -5:21 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Here’s one idea. All the outside edges are cut ad the inside edges are live. #flairww -5:37 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’d probably cover the gap in the centre with glass. #flairww-5:39 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Yikes – where’d all the space I had go? #flairww -6:07 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Three more pieces of maple for other table parts. #flairww -6:16 PM Apr 16th, 2012

MansFineFurn @FlairWoodworks I won’t ask where you had to stand to get that pic -6:31 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Not on the roof! RT @MansFineFurn: @FlairWoodworks I won’t ask where you had to stand to get that pic -6:34 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks And I begins… #flairww -6:21 PM Apr 16th, 2012

paulchinetti  Digging that! @FlairWoodworks: Here’s one idea. All the outside edges are cut ad the inside edges are live. #flairww -6:43 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @paulchinetti Thanks for the feedback! That’s what I’m going with for now. #flairww -6:45 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Does anybody know if there is a term form this kind or arrangement? It’s not a bookmatch or slipmatch. #flairww -6:56 PM Apr 16th, 2012

Brygidocious @FlairWoodworks kiss match? -6:58

FlairWoodworks I think I know what you want to say. RT @Brygidocious: @FlairWoodworks kiss match? -6:58

Brygidocious @FlairWoodworks haha shush! i remember seeing the term “kiss match” in my IP [Inside Passage School of Fine Woodworking] handout, but it was never explained -6:59

FlairWoodworks Tip: bring a water bottle to the shop and take a sip whenever you take a pause. #flairww -6:59 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @Brygidocious Really? I’ve never heard the term. -7:01

Brygidocious @FlairWoodworks its some skull and bones krenov talk that no one knows outside of those circles… -7:02 PM Apr 16th, 2012

Brygidocious @FlairWoodworks i think its a slip match, then flip one sheet end for end – 7:03 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @Brygidocious From my understanding, a slip match is just sliding the slices apart with no rotation or flipping. -7:04 PM Apr 16th, 2012

Brygidocious @FlairWoodworks yeah but this is a kiss match! -7:05 PM Apr 16th, 2012

Brygidocious @FlairWoodworks like a dis… -7:06 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Okay – I’m with you now! That “other” name is more exciting though. ;) RT @Brygidocious: @FlairWoodworks like a dis -7:08 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Surfacing lumber is a great core and upper-body workout. It even works your legs. #AllInOneGym #flairww -7:26 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @Brygidocious Scott Grove calls it spin matching. -7:27 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks One side of one slab is roughly surfaced. #flairww -7:41 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Now I need to find a way to rotate these massive and heavy slabs in my small shop. #flairww -7:42 PM Apr 16th, 2012 PM Apr 16th, 2012

Tumblewood I don’t know, but it’s what i’ve been planning for the conversion table. RT @FlairWoodworks: Does anybody know if there is a term form this kind or arrangement? It’s not a bookmatch or slipmatch. -7:49 PM Apr 16th, 2012

Tumblewood 69 bookmatch? If it wasn’t, it is now!! ;oD RT @FlairWoodworks: Does anybody know if there is a term form this kind or arrangement? It’s not a bookmatch or slipmatch. -7:51 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Oh! The cat’s out of the bag now! RT @Tumblewood: 69 bookmatch? If it wasn’t, it is now!! ;oD -7:52 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I crosshatched the surface with chalk. Now I’ll start planing.#flairww -8:03 PM Apr 16th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Only traces of blue chalk remain. Dinner time. #flairww -8:35 PM Apr 16th, 2012

I set up my video camera to record in time-lapse the flattening of the two slabs by hand (nothing too exciting).  Watch the video below.  (Duration –  4:18)

Keep going and read about Session 3!

Squirrel-Tail Palm Plane

I have many hand planes, but this Squirrel-Tail Palm Plane is among my most-used.

Squirrel-Tail Palm Plane

This plane is a very simple tool.  The investment-cast steel body incorporates a squirrel-tail handle that nestles in my palm and a divot on the toe where I can set my index finger.  The mouth width is non-adjustable.  Both the plane’s sole and blade’s back are lapped flat, making set-up of the tool easy.  Adjustments to the projection and skew of the blade are best done with light hammer taps and it is secured with a cogwheel screw.

I use this plane exclusively for rounding over and chamfering edges, so I set the blade of this plane much like I do for my spokeshave when working on rounded parts.  Instead of setting the blade so that it projects evenly on each side, I intentionally skew the blade, giving me a variable depth of cut.  This way, I can quickly begin to establish the round-over or chamfer using the left side of the blade.  Then, by simply sliding the plane sideways to engage the other edge of the blade, I can fine-tune the shape.  No adjustments are required.

I chose this plane for the task because it is small and lightweight, which allows an easy, one-handed grip.  This is how I grip the plane.

Having a small plane dedicated to chamfering and rounding over edges is certainly not necessary, but it is very convenient.

How to Listen to the Wood – Carving, Day 2

Sunday afternoon, I started a project with a board of butternut (I thought it was walnut at first).  The idea was to let the wood dictate the end result.  I documented the process of building and mounting wall brackets live on Twitter and what you see below are the updates from Day 2: Monday (you can read the first day of this project in How to Listen to the Wood – Carving, Day 1).  This was useful because each update had a time stamp so followers could see the rate at which I progressed.

(If you are not familiar with the format used on Twitter, the @ symbol indicates a username.  Every update, or “tweet” below starts with a username, being the author of that tweet.  Sometimes, you will see two or more usernames in a tweet.  The second (and third, etc) usernames are people to whom the author is talking.  The other symbol you will see is #, which serves as a category.  I tried to remember to categorize all my tweets pertaining to this project under #flairww.)

FlairWoodworks So this is where I left off yesterday. Follow along with #flairww  -12:24 PM Feb 13th, 2012 pic.twitter.com/8mmHxwDo FlairWoodworks In this tight area I’m able to hold the chisel like this and move it diagonally in the direction of the arrow. #flairww -12:55 PM Feb 13th, 2012

ravinheart @FlairWoodworks LOL .. hey, I see him now -12:25 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Working in restricted spaces is one of the biggest challenges. #flairww -12:50 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/syXu4Cxj

FlairWoodworks This section is now shaped. #flairww -1:07 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/JSgxj3ug

FlairWoodworks If a curve feels fair, it’s fair. I use my sense of touch to judge my progress. #flairww -1:12 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks As I work on this carving, I feel the need to add some colour. What do you think? Paint? Dye? Stain? Nothing? #flairww -2:24 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/6gVugXA5

asliceofwood @FlairWoodworks maybe a little darker or something to make the grain “pop” -2:28 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks You think that’s all it needs? #flairww RT @asliceofwood: @FlairWoodworks maybe a little darker or something to make the grain “pop” -2:35 PM Feb 13th, 2012

asliceofwood @FlairWoodworks yeah. I’m a fan of natural. The design looks great. -2:37 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Thanks, Tim. #flairww RT @asliceofwood: @FlairWoodworks yeah. I’m a fan of natural. The design looks great. -2:37 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I have to figure out what to do about this crack which is about 3/4″ deep at the near end and gets shallower. #flairww -2:45 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/HKpoUOUy

FlairWoodworks I love textures. #flairww -2:50 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/etucsLBr

FlairWoodworks This crack just won’t work. I’m going to cut it out and reassemble the two pieces. #flairww -3:04 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/NqMM3eoh

FlairWoodworks Here is the result of one cut on the bandsaw.#flairww -3:08 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/ELNMytL3

FlairWoodworks I’m taking advantage of the easy access with the bottom removed and carving the otherwise restricted areas. #flairww -3:13 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/Qxw0Vs9s

FlairWoodworks The trick with the ribbon is to make it look delicate without being delicate. I bevelled the ends. #flairww -3:24 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/GpjhuXvU

FlairWoodworks I use my thumb and finger to gauge the thickness. If it feels right, it’s right. #flairww -3:26 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Because the ribbon is fragile, I used a piece of plywood to support it while carving the back. #flairww -3:55 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/B8rzMMQ8

gvmcmillan @FlairWoodworks Good idea – the grain direction looks like it would make it even more fragile. #flairww What’s the project? -3:57 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @gvmcmillan The project has been evolving since the get-go. Right now, it looks like a runner crossing the finish line. #flairww -3:59 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @gvmcmillan I’m just carving and letting the piece lead the way. #flairww -4:00 PM Feb 13th, 2012

gvmcmillan @FlairWoodworks Cool! I’ve never tried that before (abstract isn’t my gift). -4:07 PM Feb 13th, 2012

FlairWoodworks When using a gouge across the grain, one side of the cut is always with the grain and the other side against. #flairww -4:15 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/2wrhj7go

FlairWoodworks When shaping convex surfaces, often a wide, flat chisel (and not a carving gouge) is the best tool. #flairww -4:16 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/W0rBOx5M

FlairWoodworks I removed most of the material from the back of the ribbon then glued the two pieces back together. #flairww -4:55 PM Feb 13th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/ugzQaCJD

FlairWoodworks I have to wait for the glue to cure, so It’s a good place to stop for the day. #flairww -4:58 PM Feb 13th, 2012

To be continued…

How to Listen to the Wood – Carving, Day 1

Sunday afternoon, I started a project with a board of butternut (I thought it was walnut at first).  The idea was to let the wood dictate the end result.  I documented the process of building and mounting wall brackets live on Twitter and what you see below are the updates from Sunday (the project wasn’t completed in one day and so there will be more to come).  This was useful because each update had a time stamp so followers could see the rate at which I progressed.

(If you are not familiar with the format used on Twitter, the @ symbol indicates a username.  Every update, or “tweet” below starts with a username, being the author of that tweet.  Sometimes, you will see two or more usernames in a tweet.  The second (and third, etc) usernames are people to whom the author is talking.  The other symbol you will see is #, which serves as a category.  I tried to remember to categorize all my tweets pertaining to this project under #flairww.)

“The inspiration for me was this irregular butternut board and a table by Jennifer Anderson called Pattern Study 1 but I was willing to listen to what the board I had on hand wanted me to do.  By the end of day one, it was clear that I was not making a table.”

Pattern Study 1 by Jennifer Anderson

FlairWoodworks I’ve got this walnut board that tapers in thickness and has a live edge. Follow my inspired process with #flairww -12:29 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/dZUHiczC

FlairWoodworks I’ve surfaced one face which revealed long checks (cracks) on it. Cutting them out would be wasteful. #flairww -12:31 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/RRT34FVl

FlairWoodworks This is going to be a carving exercise to incorporate the checks into the design. There are no defects. #flairww -12:35 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/FaTbA3Wv

FlairWoodworks I started by defining the edges with a V-gouge. #flairww -12:38 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/Dl56OB5n

FlairWoodworks I used a series of gouges to excavate between the V cuts. From left to right: 5/12, 7/10 and 9/10 gouges. #flairww -12:45 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/DZ8b8v0o

FlairWoodworks My 9/10 gouge is used extensively for roughing – much like a scrub plane. #flairww -12:58 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/WjOOcIc3

WatkinsWoodWork @FlairWoodworks Very cool…can’t wait to see the finished product of your inspiration. -12:59 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Same here! RT @WatkinsWoodWork: @FlairWoodworks Very cool…can’t wait to see the finished product of your inspiration. -1:00 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I had intended to have more cuts terminating in wide curves at the near edge but it’s already quite busy. #flairww -1:20 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/ERPufyTT

FlairWoodworks Here’s my new plan. #flairww -1:24 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/n6R2tAKK

FlairWoodworks This deep relief visually reduces the thickness of the board. I think I still need to go deeper though. #flairww -1:36 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/uTe2aCgX

WatkinsWoodWork @FlairWoodworks Yup…I agree. A bit more depth should give a nice flow. -1:39 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks My 9/25 gouge is for when I’m serious about stock removal. My 9/10 is in the background. #flairww -1:39 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/IQUU03yK

FlairWoodworks I think this looks awesome! Notice the shine on the carved surface. #flairww -1:46 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/LZ3JzV7C

FlairWoodworks This end is done for now. I think I need to make the other end scoops deeper now. #flairww -1:56 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/UKiQQv3w

TomsWorkbench @FlairWoodworks Is this a new Br’all design? -1:58 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks No sir! RT @TomsWorkbench: @FlairWoodworks Is this a new Br’all design? #flairww -1:59 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Parts of this walnut are surprisingly hard! Sections feel like hard maple. #flairww -2:00 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m not really happy with this scoop. I want the curve to be steeper but don’t have the required thickness. #flairww -2:07 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/xSn6uQ4N

WatkinsWoodWork @FlairWoodworks Very nice -2:20 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Okay – I’m back after getting a bite to eat. The carving is certainly lacking but I’m not sure what it needs. #flairww -3:17 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks It’s coming along but I’m still trying to figure out where it’s going. #flairww -3:46 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/JOeupuve

“At this point, I was not at all happy with how it was turning out.  To me, it looked like a board with one live edge, a big crack, and a whole bunch of random scoops taken out of it.  Yuck.  If I hadn’t been documenting the progress live on Twitter all along, I might have tossed it in the firewood box.  But I kept working on it, hoping that something would emerge.  Eventually something did emerge.”

FlairWoodworks I rounded over the shoulders of the cracks that I was unable to carve out. #flairww -3:57 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/TI3pwDks

cobwobbler @FlairWoodworks I like this process, letting the project evolve organically. -3:59 PM Feb 12th, 2012

cobwobbler @FlairWoodworks That’s looking good. How easy was it to cut? -4:01 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I don’t think enough people allow it to happen. RT @cobwobbler: @FlairWoodworks I like this process, letting the project evolve organically -4:02 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @cobwobbler Some parts are easy, some areas are harder and challenging. -4:02 PM Feb 12th, 2012

cobwobbler @FlairWoodworks Now it’s flowing like a river bed. Nice. -4:04 PM Feb 12th, 2012

cobwobbler @FlairWoodworks yes that works, it’s got a real flow and almost a sense of movement. -4:06 PM Feb 12th, 2012

WatkinsWoodWork @FlairWoodworks I like it. The check was distracting. -4:09 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I used a wide chisel, bevel-down, to extend the rounded corners. #flairww -4:09 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/2cPDz7CV

FlairWoodworks I like the part I just did but the rest looks lacking. I might use a saw to cut more “checks” into the board. #flairww -4:19 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/aiNAWllf

FlairWoodworks Pay attention to the wood. This little knot is a signal that the grain may change direction. #flairww -4:26 PM Feb 12th, 2012

MichaelAgate @FlairWoodworks Chris, perhaps it is fine just like it is. Sometimes knowing where to stop is the challenge :) We all like it here :) -4:26 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @MichaelAgate Thanks for the input, Michael and company. However, I feel it is not done yet. Onwards! #flairww -4:28 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I feel that I am on the right track. That’s good because it’s very difficult to undo carving ;) #flairww -4:33 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/nvsPlYA3

asliceofwood @FlairWoodworks looking good! Like all these little tips. -4:39 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks It was still looking too blocky so I went to the bandsaw and made a series of cuts. Now I’ll refine it with carving tools. #flairww -4:58 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks For unrestricted access to the edge, I clamped a short 2×4 in my vise and clamped the workpiece to it. #flairww -5:04 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/HyxEIUYO

FlairWoodworks I’m really not happy with how uniform it looks. Time for some adjustments on the bandsaw. #flairww -5:09 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/t7OZ6Ity

FlairWoodworks When I come across an inconsistency like this I have to decide whether to incorporate or eliminate it. #flairww -5:19 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/6STDj9CM

HighRockWW @FlairWoodworks I like the looks of the rest that I can see. -5:24 PM Feb 12th, 2012

MansFineFurn @FlairWoodworks character -5:24 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’m starting to see something! Can you see it? This is #exciting! #flairww -5:27 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/8bgYIh99

ravinheart @FlairWoodworks Yup I can see it it’s in there just keep letting it out -5:30 PM Feb 12th, 2012

MansFineFurn @FlairWoodworks yes -5:34 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I’ve learned to embrace sanding as sometimes it, just like any other technique, has its place. 1 side sanded. #flairww -5:46 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/l7eSW02H

FlairWoodworks Having dust collection nearby doesn’t catch all the dust but it gets most, if not all, of the airborne dust. #flairww -5:54 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/NLXct8rk

ravinheart: @FlairWoodworks a tree within a tree, water, and motion #flairww -5:56 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks We must remember to be patient with the creative process. #flairww -6:00 PM Feb 12th, 2012

MansFineFurn @FlairWoodworks A highway interchange, Dr Seuss’s horns from the Grinch, fine carving work, your mad skills, and my lack of artistry -6:14 PM Feb 12th, 2012

MansFineFurn @FlairWoodworks I keep asking myself: “but what’s it DO?” #TheEngineerLooksAtArt -6:17 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Ha ha ha! I was doing that too. #flairww RT @MansFineFurn: @FlairWoodworks I keep asking myself: “but what’s it DO?” #TheEngineerLooksAtArt -6:17 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Would anyone else care to share what they see here? #flairww  -6:19 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/bLPZRsJT

ravinheart @FlairWoodworks a running man would be in motion :) -6:22 PM Feb 12th, 2012

Flairwoodworks If you were closer I might throw him at you! ;) RT @ravinheart: @FlairWoodworks a running man would be in motion :) -6:23 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks @ravinheart sees a tree, water and motion. @MansFineFurn sees a highway interchange or Grinch horns. I see a runner. #flairww -6:25 PM Feb 12th, 2012

ravinheart @FlairWoodworks there will be no throwing :P

FlairWoodworks Ok. Dinner break. #flairww -6:29 PM Feb 12th, 2012

Tooltutor @FlairWoodworks Looks like a tree on its side being struck by a meteorite…or a flowing river being hit by a meteorite =P -6:40 PM Feb 12th, 2012

Seanw78 @FlairWoodworks something between antlers and a blowing wind -7:15 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Thanks for sharing! #flairww RT @Seanw78: @FlairWoodworks something between antlers and a blowing wind -7:18 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks So I’m back after dinner and thinking about some major material removal, as indicated by the scribble. #flairww -8:19 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/BZaZJD6Z

FlairWoodworks I think Andrew @RavinHeart may have inspired me to make this cut by hand instead of the bandsaw. #flairww -8:35 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/Ldj2xyLU

FlairWoodworks Two cutouts complete. I’m going to do some shaping next. #flairww -8:44 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/NC7oUnJP

FlairWoodworks The correct sweep of gouge is determined by which part of the edge engages. The corners should not engage. #flairww -8:56 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/RL6YgbrV

FlairWoodworks Out damned crack! I know it doesn’t go through but I can’t tell how deep it is. I’ll keep going… #flairww -9:03 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/xcHDAwkC

FlairWoodworks I’m defining what I think is a ribbon running horizontally across what I think is the waist of the runner. #flairww -9:33 PM Feb 12th, 2012

pic.twitter.com/2PUlxHYW

FlairWoodworks I’m using a 15/6 (60-degree V) gouge to undercut the ribbon. #flairww -9:49 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I want to remove this narrow bit that I’ve shaded but I know it will mean a lot more work. It’s worth it. #flairww -10:12 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks A good tool solves problems without causing any. This Knew Concepts fret saw is certainly a good tool. #flairww -10:16 PM Feb 12th, 2012

Tumblewood @FlairWoodworks fun to watch your creative improvisation. -10:34 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Thanks, Vic! #flairww -10:37 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks I finished roughing the cutout. Now to refine that confined space. Not fun. #flairww -10:42 PM Feb 12th, 2012

FlairWoodworks Time for another break! #flairww -11:00 PM Feb 12th, 2012

The carving is continued in How to Listen to the Wood – Carving, Day 2.

Making a Pair of Hollows and Rounds

A while ago, I came up with a more efficient way to make a wooden molding plane. There are some compromises, but the tool is very practical, does a good job and quick and easy to make. For this pair of planes with 1″ wide blades, I started with material 1-3/8″ thick. I used my table saw with a full-kerf blade to resaw off a 1/4″ slice which would become one cheek. I then made two 1″ deep cuts for the bed and ramp, at 50- and 60-degrees respectively. The saw leaves clean surfaces which require no further cleanup.

The next step is to remove the triangular piece of waste between the two cuts. I start with a narrower 1/2″ chisel to remove the bulk, then switch to a wider 3/4″ or 1″ chisel and a pair of skews to finish the work. The refinement of this surface is not critical – it’s more for aesthetics.

Now I put the cheek that I sawed off earlier back in place. I drill a pair of 1/8″ holes in the upper corners to use 1/8″ dowels to positively locate the two pieces. I cut a length of 3/8″ square stock a little wider than the plane (1-1/4″) and round over about 5/16″ on both ends. I use a carving knife and a drill gauge to make the ends round and check their dimension, ensuring both are uniform. Next, I locate the position of the pin at the midpoint and about 1/2″ above the ramp. I install the drill bit matching the diameter of the ends of the pin in my drill press and bore through both cheeks.

Next, I remove the cheek and check that the pin fits properly. If all is well, it’s time for glue-up. I use one caul larger than the plane itself and a handful of clamps. The pin goes in first and does not get glued.

While the glue is drying, it’s a good time to flatten the back of the blades. If your blades are blank, now would also be a good time to approximately grind the profiles. Once the glue is dried, it’s time to make and fit the wedge. I’ve been informed that an angle of around 1:4 works well. I checked the wedges that I’ve made in the past and they are pretty close to that angle. When making the wedge, I like to use an over-long piece of stock for ease of handling.

Cut the wedge, plane it smooth, and test-fit it in place with the blade installed. Wiggle the iron and see if it seems to rotate at one point which indicates a high spot. Rework the wedge and try again until it registers fully across the blade and pin.

All that’s left is to shape the planes. The trick is to shape the round (convex) plane first. Make the arc of the blade and sole match. Then use the round plane to shape the sole of the hollow (concave) plane. Finally, shape the concave blade to the sole. I like to stamp my initials on the back of the planes as well.

Last weekend, I gave a workshop on making this pair of planes for some members of the Pacific Woodworkers Guild. Everyone had a good time and gained both knowledge and experience.